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I am a computer science student taking a course on philosophy. My topic of research is on freedom of will and whether it is possible to create a machine capable (or closely) of doing so.

I felt that my first steps would be to find some articles related to the brain, to find out which part of the brain is fully / partially responsible free will, the activity that goes on in the brain when one is 'exercising his freedom of will'. I have been searching on google with keywords like 'free-will, neuroscience, brain' but have not found a good article.

I was hoping for the community to give me some nice references for a good start. Anything related would be kindly appreciated as well.

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closed as too broad by David, Bryan Krause, kmm, AliceD Nov 26 '17 at 19:33

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ I'm sorry to say this question is likely outside our guidelines for a number of reasons. I recommend reading through the asking guidlines and the help center in general and then seeing if you can formulate a question that's more within the scope of this site. $\endgroup$ – Harris Nov 17 '17 at 21:33
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    $\begingroup$ You need to choose your definition of free will. Under the incompatibilist's view you are out of luck. Under the compatibilist's approach, the issue simply boils down to decision making, of which several computational models exist. Under a strict definition of free will, you must accept some source of causation other than physical determinism, something that is not compatible with the scientific approach. So, you'll either have to relax your definition or reject its existence. $\endgroup$ – vkehayas Nov 17 '17 at 21:33
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    $\begingroup$ You seem to be assuming that free will occurs at all in the universe. $\endgroup$ – sterid Nov 19 '17 at 3:36
  • $\begingroup$ You might want to search for publications by Felix Tretter (most are in German, unfortunately) $\endgroup$ – jwdietrich Nov 19 '17 at 13:55
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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because ‘free will’ is a philosophic not a biological concept. $\endgroup$ – David Nov 19 '17 at 21:33
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One potential argument has been introduced in an essay of the biologist Martin Heisenberg, and relates to the stochasticity of chemical reactions that occur within biology.

Note that, depending on the philosophic tradition, this may not be regarded as free will.

For a link to the original essay (paywall), and the follow-up comments (and objections) by other scientists - of which all appeared in the reputable journal of Nature - see: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19444190

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