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There is a biology project I must do with some of my classmates and we're facing a problem. We would like to choose proteins from different viruses that seem interesting to us (for example one protein from a negative-strand ARN virus and the other one from a DNA virus) and gather them (theory) together through this process called "directed mutagenesis". Is it possible ? If no, isn't there another mechanism that allows the gathering ?

Thank you ! (PS: Sorry for the english)

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  • $\begingroup$ Please clarify. Explain what you mean by ‘gather’. What level class are you talking about — high school or university? Is this project practical or theoretical? $\endgroup$
    – David
    Dec 29, 2017 at 16:23

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If I understand your question, you're asking if you can take a protein from Virus A, and make Virus B produce that protein. The answer is yes, you certainly can do that, although depending on the proteins and viruses there may be some constraints. There are many examples of this being done, and even more examples of making a virus produce proteins from humans or other species.

The actual process of inserting a new gene can be pretty trivial; you can pick up handy kits of viruses specifically designed to have new genes inserted into them. If you're putting the gene into a virus of your interest, the design process can be a little trickier; you need to be sure that the inserted protein doesn't disrupt something essential for the recipient, isn't too large for its genome, and so on.

But in principle, it's pretty simple.

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