1
$\begingroup$

Are there other species that get nosebleeds? If so, do they occur for the same reasons that humans get nosebleeds? How would an animal stop a nosebleed?

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Cats, dogs and other animals can suffer from epistaxis. The causes differ depending on the animal.

foreign things in the nose, abscess, cancerous growth, snake bite, some poisonings and diseases especially in the trachea and lungs and anthrax. Sometimes excessive sneezing or coughing can result in nose bleeding as well. All animals are susceptible to get nose bleeding.

They would need to see their vet or owner to get it treated.

https://www.thevillager.com.na/articles/7474/Dealing-With-an-Animal-Bleeding-From-the-Nose/

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Nose bleeding (or epistaxis, as Graham rightly termed it) is common to many species, such as dogs, cats, pigs, and many other animals. As for the causes, like Graham pointed out, it really varies from species to species.

To take dogs for an example, the leading causes of spontaneous nose bleeding are leishmaniasis (a tropical / subtropical disease transmitted by sandflies) and other bacterial infections, such as CME (canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, a disease spread by ticks).

As you can imagine, minor trauma to the nasal region can also cause nose bleeding, not just in dogs, but in many other animal kinds.

That said, I feel sorry for the elephant who gets a nose bleed.


Sources:

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.