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If yes. Does it change its shape in every disease, or does it remain in the same shape and cause several diseases?

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closed as too broad by David, Bryan Krause, Satwik Pasani, kmm, AliceD May 7 '18 at 19:31

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ If you are describing a taxon of bacterium, then it is definite that a bacterial taxon is capable of this, depending on your definition of disease. A pathogenic bacterium could infect two different host species (Mycobacterium sp. in fish and humans). Additionally, a particular pathogenesis may be determined by the site of the bacterial infection. For example, Staphylococcus aureus is often associated with cutaneous diseases (Staph infection) like dermatitis. It may also induce pneumonia and endocarditis, still retaining the same shape - a coccoid-type - and still cause several diseases. $\endgroup$ – Epistemonaut Apr 17 '18 at 20:45
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Yes, one type of bacteria can cause multiple diseases. For example:

"Rheumatic fever is caused by group A Streptococcus. This bacterium causes strep throat or, in a small percentage of people, scarlet fever. It’s an inflammatory disorder." [https://www.healthline.com/health/rheumatic-fever#causes].

The difference is in how the individual's immune system responds to the infection (and how the infection is treated). Everyone responds a bit differently to the same infection.

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  • $\begingroup$ "The difference is in how the individual's immune system responds to the infection (and how the infection is treated). Everyone responds a bit differently to the same infection." Can you support this with a reliable source? $\endgroup$ – anongoodnurse Apr 19 '18 at 2:23
  • $\begingroup$ I can give you some good examples: $\endgroup$ – S. McGrew Apr 19 '18 at 3:45
  • $\begingroup$ Valley fever (a fungus disease that affects the lungs) is no more serious than a minor cold to some people, but kills some people. Although malaria is a multicellular parasite, the fact that people with sickle-cell anemia (which is due to a particular genetic variation) are more resistant than other people shows that a victim's genetics can affect how a disease affects the victim. Flu often affects certain age groups more severely than other age groups. $\endgroup$ – S. McGrew Apr 19 '18 at 4:01
  • $\begingroup$ And, a classical example is the results of Europeans' introduction of measles to the native Americans: a disease that was a minor discomfort to the Europeans was deadly to the native Americans. $\endgroup$ – S. McGrew Apr 19 '18 at 4:04
  • $\begingroup$ The example of group A Streptococcus causing strep throat sometimes, rheumatic fever sometimes, and scarlet fever sometimes is really perfect: the same bacterium affects different people differently. $\endgroup$ – S. McGrew Apr 19 '18 at 4:06

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