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enter image description here Source

enter image description here Source

enter image description here Source

Acetoacetyl-CoA is a C3 unit.

3-Hydroxybutyryl-CoA / Butyryl is a C4 unit.

Where does the additional C atom come from? I'm suspecting it's another Acetyl-CoA -> CoA reaction, but I don't see it in the images.

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    $\begingroup$ What does ABE mean? Do not use non-standard abbreviations in titles and if you must use them in your question define them. This allows indexing and improves your chance of getting an answer. And edit your image so we can see the reaction you are concerned about. Have you tried other sources for an answer? $\endgroup$ – David Apr 26 '18 at 18:14
  • $\begingroup$ @David fixed the title and added additional images I looked at. Maybe I'm missing something obvious. $\endgroup$ – idkfa Apr 26 '18 at 19:02
  • $\begingroup$ I think you are. $\endgroup$ – David Apr 26 '18 at 21:17
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Well, I’m not sure I should answer this, as your question is predicated by an incorrect supposition:

Acetoacetyl-CoA is a C3 unit.

3-Hydroxybutyryl-CoA / Butyryl is a C4 unit.

Not according to Kegg:

Acetoacetyl- and Butanoyl-CoA

However, my answer is worthwhile if I explain how I found this out. One way to check this sort of thing is to go to the Kegg website and search for the compounds of interest, find the appropriate pathway (shown below) and then click to check compounds and reactions.

enter image description here

There is also the Metacyc website for metabolic pathways, and you can check the formulae on Wikipedia.

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  • $\begingroup$ Kind of embarrassing that I missed that. It was so fixed in my head that it's C3 that I didn't even thought of checking that assumption. But your answer, as you already suspected, is worthwhile nonetheless. I went over to KEGG and was successfully able to navigate to the same map as you did. This will be a helpful place to start searching for answers in the future. $\endgroup$ – idkfa Apr 26 '18 at 21:26

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