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I need help identifying this particular palm tree. Unfortunately, I don’t have many details to give, and I’m by no means one to say I’m even an amateur at plant identification. We are unsure of its origin and can only confirm it’s age by how long we’ve resided here in Hockessin, Delaware. The plant is over the age of 14, and it stands a little over 12 feet high. The foliage is composed of single green shoots coming from the head of the plant which descend gracefully and reorganize into what one without knowledge would say is bark. We are looking to purchase another tree of this species or a close relative; there was a recent loss of an identical tree which sat opposed to this one.

Foliage

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  • $\begingroup$ Probably not a palm, looks like something in the Agavaceae so for example, a yucca or joshua tree (though not that specifically). Try searching your local nursery websites for "yuccas" or something similar. Or show the picture to your local nursery/landscape person or horticulture expert (maybe county extension agent). $\endgroup$ – Bryan Hanson May 4 '18 at 18:24
  • $\begingroup$ I'm not sure about the species, but the staking seems a little intense. Was the other tree staked the same way? $\endgroup$ – Rhizoqueer May 4 '18 at 22:06
  • $\begingroup$ I notice the soil is sandy and there is Opuntia growing nearby. Yucca and Opuntia like it dry typically, and warm. I see you are outside Philadelphia PA USA, where there are very cold winters. This must be a species of Yucca that can take the cold. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Hanson May 5 '18 at 0:58
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Appears to me to be a Yucca tree, from the family Asparagaceae, whereas palms are typically a member of Arecaceae.

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After searching various sites about cold-hardy yuccas, and looking at images, I think you have Yucca rostrata or possibly a hybrid of it. According to Wikipedia it can be grown in zone 5. Your location is zone 7, but perhaps if the microhabitat is just right it can survive your winters (perhaps the sandy soil evident in the picture helps it survive, since sand drains well). I suggest you look at the description of the plant and images online and compare it to your specimen to see how well it fits.

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