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I have observed bumblebees hover over an a abrborvitae (Thuja occidentalis) hedge. A bumblebee will hover in a in one spot over the hedge for about 5-7 seconds, zip to another spot, hover for about 5-7 seconds, then another spot, then another. The bees will never land on the hedge. At any one time during anyone day, there will be only one bee hovering over the hedge. This behavior will go on like this all day.

Why do the bees do this?

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    $\begingroup$ The behavior sounds more like a hoverfly than a bumblebee. $\endgroup$ – mgkrebbs May 9 '18 at 23:30
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    $\begingroup$ It's not a hover fly,they don't fool me. I've walked right up to it and it didn't move. I considered that it might be guarding something,I've seen them guarding an especialy fragant viburnum. This bush was covered in bumble bees. I had to crawl backward to get out of there or one would have stung me. $\endgroup$ – peter May 10 '18 at 17:15
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    $\begingroup$ Perhaps it is a solitary bee that has a mud nest on the Thuya tree, or another variety that has a burrow. $\endgroup$ – com.prehensible Aug 9 '18 at 8:34
  • $\begingroup$ Could you perhaps make a picture of the bee? BTW: Bumblebees rarely sting. $\endgroup$ – RHA Sep 8 '18 at 20:37
  • $\begingroup$ I can't get a picture of it in september,that's for sure. $\endgroup$ – peter Sep 9 '18 at 17:28
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Could actually be a male carpenter bee. They hover around like that waiting for females to pass by. If it is a male carpenter bee dont worry about it, they arent equipped with a stinger.

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    $\begingroup$ I'll check to see what it is,but why would a male carpenter bee do this? Can you include some kind of reference for this? Maybe a link? $\endgroup$ – peter May 11 '18 at 14:31
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Today I hit the arborvitae In my yard, in which at least 5 or six HUGE bumblebees fell to the ground. After my initial shock, I hit each of the arborvitae along my fence and a dozen more fell out. I believe these Bumbles have nested in my trees, which may explain the hovering behavior; they are either scouting out a place to rest or visiting their young, not entirely sure. Hope this helps

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