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Can you use indirect immounofluoresence to verify if a vaccine will work against a virus?

Using the vaccine antibodies against the virus, plus a second antibody with fluorophore that will join the first.

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't think that experiment would prove that the immune system will be sufficiently stimulated by your vaccine to elict the desired response. $\endgroup$ – swbarnes2 Jun 4 '18 at 22:33
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A vaccine isn't antibodies. It's bits of virus or microbe that elicits a response from the immune system, the most important component being the creation of specific memory cells which are ready to react if the real invader is introduced.

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You can use an immunoassay like a homogeneous sandwich FRET assay: You can use donor-dye-labelled fluorophore antibodies that are able to recognise specific antigens on the virus to bind the virus antigen, then introduce a second set of antibodies labelled with acceptor-dye fluorophore. If the vaccine works and produces an immune response in the in-vivo model that destroys the virus, the antigen that joins the donor-labelled and acceptor-labelled antibodies is also destroyed and can no longer “sandwich” the two antibodies close together within the Förster distance to exhibit FRET.

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