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This plant looks more like a shrub - not a tree

It stays the same color when ripe. It's about the same size as a pear. Grows in sub tropical climate of Meghalaya, India.

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ It seems like cutting it open and showing the inside would give us more insights $\endgroup$
    – PlasmaHH
    Jun 10, 2018 at 8:24
  • $\begingroup$ Will cut it open and check if it is indeed Solanum Muricatum as suggested. $\endgroup$ Jun 11, 2018 at 3:59

3 Answers 3

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I think this looks a lot like a pale variety of Solanum Muricatum or Pepino dulce/melon/pear.

enter image description here enter image description here

It's native to South America, but I think that it would be able to be cultivated in India as well.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you so much. This very much looks like the plant I have as well. $\endgroup$ Jun 11, 2018 at 3:54
  • $\begingroup$ @JamesSyngai Did you know already that you can mark an answer as accepted, if it answers your question? You just need to click the check mark symbol next to the up and down arrows of that answer. $\endgroup$
    – Arsak
    Jun 18, 2018 at 15:42
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It looks like Tinda (Praecitrullus fistulosus), also known as round melon, Indian round gourd, Indian baby pumpkin, apple gourd, or Indian squash.

enter image description here

Source: https://www.bigbasket.com/pd/10000372/fresho-tinda-250-gm/

enter image description here

Source: http://fruitspecies.blogspot.com/2008/10/tinda-indian-round-gourd.html

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I am not fully sure but in my opinion the leaves look more like chili pepper leaves and it resembles a tomato or eggplant in the fruit, with a similar stem. It's likely a member in the nightshade family (also known as Solanaceae) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanaceae .

For reference, a green eggplant:

A green Eggplant

However, I am unsure what the specific species might be as the leaves don't match the typical eggplant pattern.

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