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Looking into how neural networks are build in the brain, here are a couple of facts followed by some questions:

  1. The neuron receives the signal through its dendrites and passes it to the terminal at the end of the axon.
  2. A neuron can have as much as 1000 connections to other neurons.

As I understand the dendrites can be connected to multiple neurons, so the neuron we are talking about can receive signals from multiple cells. Now the questions:

  1. The terminals at the axons can be connected to just one or to multiple neurons?
  2. If the axon terminals can be connected to multiple neurons, how does the neuron transmitting the signal knows to which of the further neurons to pass the signal next? Is it passing to all of them at once?
  3. If the axon's terminal can be connected to only one other neuron (for the single axon neurons), how are the two-axon neurons working? How do they know to which axon to pass the signal next?
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The neuron that sends the signal does not know which neuron to send the info to. The job of the neurons getting the signal is to identify whether it is their turn to get activated by the signal.

This is controlled by a protein. Depending on how often the neuron is used, a number of channels are formed on the surface of the dendrites. The activation happens at an optimal level of the protein present in the cell depending on the number of channels on the surface.. Each time the cell receives the signal, this some of this protein is created.

First, the neurons with most channels is activated, but if the organism does not get the memory that is wants, the earlier neuron will continue with sending more signals. Then receiving-neuron-number-1 stops activating (because peak concentration has passed) and the next one starts. This continues for all neurons.

In layman's terms, from info-1 to info-2, info-2 is chosen in the order of thoughts most associated with info-1 to least associated.

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