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Sometimes when I do gardening, I notice multiple blades of grass appear fused together at the root, yet still appear to be segmented. When I look at images, I get some that suggest each blade is an individual plant like this one, and I find ones that suggest they're fused together like this other one, and I wouldn't know if they're actually fused or if they just have a tendency to have seeds or roots distributed in a clumped manner as some survival strategy.

Should it be assumed that each individual blade of grass is a separate plant, or otherwise how many blades are part of the same plant?

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Each blade of grass is part of the grass plant and may have multiple blades. Clumping grasses, when mature, can spread producing multiple shoots with additional blades. The number of blades would depend on the type of grass and individual seed, but the clumping grasses tend to produce 10-16 leaves/blades.

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Source: Poaceae - Wikepedia

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They are clones, technically a single plant, even if disconnected at some point. Usually they are connected through the root system, through a rhizome which will produce additional shoots that go up vertically above the ground. Once a decent root system has developed, new offshoots (of the same plant) will continue to grow vertically, even if separated from one another.

This is a bamboo grass, This is a bamboo grass

In a bamboo forest (or any patch of grass), it is possible that entire groups of trees are actually just one plant.

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