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"The current definition is that organisms are open systems that maintain homeostasis, are composed of cells, have a life cycle, undergo metabolism, can grow, adapt to their environment, respond to stimuli, reproduce and evolve." (Wikipedia)

Could McDonalds(or any other chain store) be considered a life form according to the current most accepted definition of Life? If not, what am i missing?

It evolves and changes over time; it reproduces by using excess Material to build new stores, it responds to outer stimuli by adapting to them; it grows to a point it is benefical; it starts to function sometime and will eventually stop; it autoregulates it self trying to maintain a stable state and it has a very complex metabolism

Thanks in advance

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    $\begingroup$ SE Biology is a question and answer site for real problems in Biology. It is not a philosophical discussion site. Please read the Introduction and Help for the site. $\endgroup$ – David Jul 13 '18 at 19:19
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No. First of all, an "organism" is not automatically a "life form". And it is easy to see that McDonald's does not have an information repository in the form of a genome-like structure, where mutations are quantum-acausal, but still have causal consequences on the bearing reproductive units and they trace an evolutionary path all the way down to the ancestor. In your food stores there is no such a thing. Everything is just engineered and organized by us humans. This is "intelligent design" (although fast food is not really an intelligent thing to do) and has nothing to do with evolution in the biological sense.

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