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And since the brain can be tricked to thinking that objects with mostly black and grey gradients are moving, like optical illusions, does that mean motion has a color?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Remi.b, Bryan Krause, David, anongoodnurse, John Jul 16 '18 at 4:06

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ According to your title you should consider a repetition from optics. But anyway it is quite interesting question. $\endgroup$ – L.Diago Jul 14 '18 at 17:59
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Based on your question: if fully color-blind people see whites, blacks, and greys, that means that humans can see them colors. After all, aren't color-blind people humans?

If you actually think about it, is color just created by evolved cells? If so, should we not see just black, grey, and white?

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