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I just read this article on the evolutionary divergence between humans and chimps, and how the most significant event was when the 24 number of chromosomes in chimps was reduced to 23 in humans due to chromosomal fusion. However, while this even significantly supports the theory of evolution, how does this affect natural selection? What phenotypical changes may have occured between these two groups because of the chromosomal fusion? And what if chromosomal fusion did not occur? Would speciation still occur by other means, e.g. geographic isolation?

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  • $\begingroup$ A few comments. 1) Is there any reason for using the phrasing while this even significantly supports the theory of evolution, how does this affect natural selection? instead of just asking How did this large mutational event affect the phenotype and the fitness of the carrier? 2) And what if chromosomal fusion did not occur? this type of what "what if the world was different" are impossible to answer on a science website $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Jul 23 '18 at 20:16
  • $\begingroup$ 3) Would speciation still occur by other means do you have any reason to think that this mutational event lead to reproductive isolation? Between which lineages then (two hominids lineages and among the pan and hominid lineages)? $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Jul 23 '18 at 20:16
  • $\begingroup$ Ah I see. I'm only eighteen so my question phrasing is still underdeveloped. And I believe reproductive isolation would occur due to post-zygotic barriers such as infertile offspring. The difference in chromosomes number should have an affect on offspring production, either disallowing it, lowering survival chance, or having the offspring infertile. And as for the lineages... I have not studied them haha $\endgroup$ – Von Vic Cayas Jul 23 '18 at 20:40
  • $\begingroup$ Are you claiming that humans with balanced Robertsonian translocations are reproductively isolated? $\endgroup$ – swbarnes2 Jul 23 '18 at 20:47
  • $\begingroup$ @swbarnes2 After a quick research, I would say I am claiming that those affected with Robertsonian translocation are reproductively isolated. $\endgroup$ – Von Vic Cayas Jul 23 '18 at 20:51

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