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enter image description here This bugs are everywhere in my house and we've tried so many home remedies, but they won't leave. Can anyone help us!?

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE! I suggest you to take the tour to learn about the site and earn your first badge. Also, it is useful to include your geographical location when looking for a species identification. $\endgroup$ – LinuxBlanket Aug 5 '18 at 18:09
  • $\begingroup$ Also check any cat or dog dry food if you have any. $\endgroup$ – user45422 Aug 12 '18 at 17:52
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That is an Indian meal moth Plodia interpunctella. Family Pyralidae. They are very common household pests. https://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/indian_meal_moth.htm They breed in grains or cereals. You need to look through your pantry, and find out what they have been breeding in. Seal up your grains and cereals in plastic, or put them all in the fridge.

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  • $\begingroup$ They are also known in some areas as pantry moths, due to their association with that location, i.e. infestation. Note that plastic bags will not keep them out as both the adult moths and the grubs can chew though thin plastic. Infested plastic bags will have a multitude of silk threads, small uneaten food particles, and grub cases in it. The plastic containers need to have thick solid walls with an airtight lid. $\endgroup$ – CJ Dennis Aug 6 '18 at 0:51
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, you need to go through the items in your pantry, probably you will find some infested bags/boxes. Discarding them will help in getting rid of them. $\endgroup$ – Ozgur Ozturk Aug 6 '18 at 2:18
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This is probably a common flour moth or a similar pyralid species. It has probably laid eggs in some cereal-derived products (pasta, cous cous, but also rice, oatmeal and the like) of your kitchen. First of all, check carefully your pantry for infested food and throw it away. Then (from the above Wikipedia link):

None of the stages of the organism (eggs, larvae, adults) are very temperature tolerant and all can be killed by a week of freezing or by brief heating in a microwave or conventional oven when such treatment is practical. Scrubbing infested areas with a mixture of soap and water or vinegar is also effective. [...] Nontoxic traps are also available to monitor outbreaks. One type of trap is a triangular box with a pheromone lure and sticky walls inside. These traps are generally known as pheromone traps. In this case, male moths are attracted inside by the female pheromone (the lure) and then get stuck against the sticky walls inside the box.

From personal experience, it can be sufficient to check the pantry and seal all the cereal-derived food into plastic bags.

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  • $\begingroup$ It's possible you had a different species to the one I encountered. Mine were capable of chewing through plastic bags and infesting them. See my comment on Karl Kjer's answer. $\endgroup$ – CJ Dennis Aug 6 '18 at 0:54

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