0
$\begingroup$

For an experiment I'm going to prepare an artificial seawater agar. Before use, I have to sterilize the medium of course. I imagine, that autoclaving will cause the salts in the seawater to precipitate. Can I re-suspend them afterwards, or will it irreversibly change the composition of my medium? Should I use a different sterilization method altogether, e.g. filter sterilization?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Why should they precipitate? Warm water dissolves more salts than colder. $\endgroup$ – Chris Aug 8 '18 at 12:55
0
$\begingroup$

I see no reason why it would precipitate chemically. Besides, you need to dissolve the agar via heat. Hence, auclaving is fine.

If you do not believe me these protocol allow for autoclaving of seawater agar 15min cycle 121 degrees: 1. https://www.dsmz.de/microorganisms/medium/pdf/DSMZ_Medium246.pdf 2. http://himedialabs.com/TD/M592.pdf

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Hi @AdamRadekMartinez. This is a good answer. You don't need to preface your sources with "if you do not believe me", though. Just reference them. Biology.SE answers should include references, with no expectation that a poster will just be believed without them :) $\endgroup$ – De Novo Aug 8 '18 at 16:41

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.