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Could a viable organ be partially grown in a test tube then be hooked up to the host in some way until it is large enough to swap it with the bad organ?

For example: Could a smaller replacement heart have a tiny pacemaker to keep a separate heart rhythm and grown in a different part of the body cavity like the appendix?

Then when the organ is mature, remove the organ from the appendix and then transplant to another person or on oneself?

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  • $\begingroup$ Speculative questions like this are not good for Biology.SE; unfortunately, because of the bounty I cannot currently vote to close. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Dec 28 '18 at 20:36
  • $\begingroup$ I don't understand your comment. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Dec 28 '18 at 20:42
  • $\begingroup$ @BryanKrause I noticed that you have to wait 2 days before a bounty can be placed. If a question goes unnoticed it could be locked in by a bounty. If the time limit is extended the bad question could be closed with less rush. $\endgroup$ – Muze the good Troll. Dec 28 '18 at 20:45
  • $\begingroup$ I don't think questions are closed with rush, they should be closed quickly, and also it is important to note that questions that are voted to be closed are initially put on hold; they have several days to be improved and brought back if the improvements solve the problems that led to close votes. However, this is a discussion for Meta. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Dec 28 '18 at 20:47
  • $\begingroup$ While the specific hypothesis on potential implementation (given as example) is very speculative, it is not needed to answer the core question. $\endgroup$ – tsttst Dec 29 '18 at 7:13
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Could a viable organ be partially grown in a test tube then be hooked up to the host in some way until it is large enough to swap it with the bad organ?

Yes. This conceptual possibility already is a reality for one organ, namely the skin.

For an example see the following story in a good scientific journal: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/11/boy-rare-disease-gets-new-skin-thanks-gene-corrected-stem-cells

Unfortunately this doesn’t yet mean that conceptually homologous procedures could already be performed for most organs.

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