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my question is do you know a fructose degrading bacteria?
Wich is straitforward to use and cultivate?
Wich shouldn't create excrements, that can't be removed simple.

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closed as off-topic by David, AliceD Sep 26 '18 at 19:15

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Homework questions are off-topic on Biology unless you have shown your attempt at an answer. For more information see our homework policy." – David, AliceD
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Welcome to SE Biology. As a new contributor we do not wish to discourage you, but your question falls somewhat short of what is expected here. You would benefit from reading the help on how to ask questions where you will see that good questions are of general interest, provide detail and context, and show evidence that that poster has done research of his own before asking. Do some internet searching and then modify your question to tell us what you have found about fructose degrading bacteria and what you still need to know. $\endgroup$ – David Sep 13 '18 at 22:42
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Many bacteria use fructose as the growth substrate but there is a small group of bacteria called fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB), for which fructose is the optimal growth substrate.

FLAB includes several species of the genus Fructobacillus (F. tropaeoli, F. pseudoficulneus, F. ficulneus, F. fructosus, Frucobacillus durionis) and Lactobacillus (Lactobacillus apinorum, Lactobacillus kunkeei, Lactobacillus florum), isolated from fructose-rich environments, including flowers, fruits, fermented fruits, and the guts of insects that feed on plants rich in fructose.

FLAB can be further differentiated into obligately and facultatively fructophilic, based on their preference for fructose over glucose as the growth substrate.


Endo et al. (2018) Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria, a unique group of fructose-fermenting microbes. Appl Environ Microbiol. 84: e01290-18.

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  • $\begingroup$ that sounds great, I will research soon. Thanks for the answer. $\endgroup$ – Flajt Sep 23 '18 at 8:26

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