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Each retrovirus produces thousands of copies. They would spread and kill every cell in the body in a few days. I would like to see the math behind how this doesn't happen.

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closed as off-topic by Remi.b, De Novo, David, iayork, AliceD Sep 26 '18 at 19:17

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Homework questions are off-topic on Biology unless you have shown your attempt at an answer. For more information see our homework policy." – Remi.b, De Novo, AliceD
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Where are you getting the idea that for a retrovirus, in particular, each particle produces 1000 copies that each effectively infect and kill a cell with a probably and a time scale that would kill, I'm assuming a human a in a matter of days. Maybe you could give us a source and then show us your math? $\endgroup$ – De Novo Sep 17 '18 at 2:59
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    $\begingroup$ It's just a bit of an odd question because retroviruses don't behave in this manner. I think you've misunderstood something about thei retrovirus life cycle. $\endgroup$ – De Novo Sep 17 '18 at 3:05
  • $\begingroup$ I chose to voted to close this with a homework reason instead of a duplicate because the duplicate doesn't have an answer (and should probably have been closed) $\endgroup$ – De Novo Sep 17 '18 at 3:08
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It's not a matter of math, it's a matter of biology. Even bacteria have an "immune system" of sorts that will degrade foreign RNA. The study of these bacterial immune systems was what led to the CRISPR/Cas system for genetic engineering. Most organisms have some analogue to DICER which attacks viral RNA.

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