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I was wondering about what general range for the net charge of DNA in human cells is in Coulombs. I imagine that kind of thing would be hard to measure but could be approximately calculated/estimated. Could you approximate it by taking the average number of base pairs in the human genome and multiplying it by the charge of a phosphate group? Would you have to multiply by two as well because there are two phosphate groups attached to each base pair?

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That reasoning seems to work for Harvard's bionumbers database. They use a charge of -2 per base pair, and then estimate the linear charge density as 2e / 0.34 nm, where 0.34 nm is the length of a base pair. There are approximately 3.08 billion base pairs in the human genome, so you could run the same calculation: $2e \cdot 3.08 \cdot 10^9 = 9.86 \cdot 10^{-10} C$.

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