1
$\begingroup$

This is more a question about the evolution of taste than about the chemical composition of vegetables. Why don't vegetables taste good despite being healthful?

$\endgroup$

closed as primarily opinion-based by terdon, theforestecologist, De Novo, kmm, David Feb 25 at 11:33

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Probably because vegetables are usually the parts of plants that plants don't want to be eaten by others. $\endgroup$ – Cell Oct 1 '18 at 13:27
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ This question might in fact be a question about the inferior quality of vegetables that are grown in greenhouses or other industrial facilities. $\endgroup$ – aventurin Oct 1 '18 at 15:37
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Who says vegetables don't taste good? Depends on the vegetable, of course, but IMHO peas picked fresh from the vine are in the top 10 or so of yummy things. Carrots, cucumbers, peppers (or are they a fruit?) and more are all quite good. $\endgroup$ – jamesqf Oct 1 '18 at 18:01
  • $\begingroup$ @jamesqf Everyone agrees they don't taste as good as fruits. $\endgroup$ – Thomas Oct 2 '18 at 2:22
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @Thomas: Everyone does NOT agree. Of course it depends on the particular vegetable and fruit, and on the individual. But there are a great many vegetable that IMHO taste better than say an uncooked quince, cornelian cherry, or even some of the modern store varities of apples. $\endgroup$ – jamesqf Oct 3 '18 at 5:59
1
$\begingroup$

We are evolved to survive starvation, and live to be perhaps 35. So fatty foods with lots of calories taste good to us. Our genes (and preferences) lag thousands of years behind our present environment.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure about your statement that humans evolved to live 35 years. Prior to modern medicine, that was the mean, but it was skewed left by very high infant mortality. If they survived infancy, neandertals would live 60-70 years. $\endgroup$ – kmm Oct 31 '18 at 16:24
  • $\begingroup$ I have not heard that @kmm. What is your source. Mine is admittedly a TV show, and I am an entomologist. But as far as I understood, Neanderthals lived to be 30 or 35. Even if they lived longer, it does not matter, because evolution only acts on child bearers. $\endgroup$ – Karl Kjer Oct 31 '18 at 23:19
-1
$\begingroup$

Because your primary school cafeteria used to serve canned vegetables, you've hated vegetables ever since, and you haven't tasted them cooked properly yet.

To make vegetables taste good, one thing you can do is going to your local farmers market, buying whatever looks appealing to you and asking the farmer for suggestions on how to cook it.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.