I would like to investigate the dynamic of the number of cells over time as the embryo grows. I am interested in any multicellular animal species for which we can have some data. How does the number of cells change over time in an embryo?

I welcome any graphs, empirical data and/or mathematical expression for this dynamics.

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    Its a bit unclear what you are asking are you talking about how it has changed across many species or how it changes in a single species through a single organisms life cycle. in hte case of the former this may be a place to start, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10225991 – John Oct 11 at 15:16
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    The question seems very unclear but I think this is because OP is using the term "evolution" where she/he should not. I don't think OP meant evolution as in the sense that a population evolve as to change the number of cells in the embryo (whatever that would mean as the stage is not specified) but rather the question is I would like to investigate the dynamic of the number of cells over time as the embryo grows. I am interested in any multicellular animal species for which we can have some data. How does the number of cells change over time in an embryo?. Is that right, @J.A? – Remi.b Oct 11 at 17:25
  • @Remi.b it is indeed what I meant. Thx – J.A Oct 12 at 13:00
  • your biggest limit is going to be how difficult it becomes to count the total number of cells, especially once you get past the blastula stage. In the beginning its fairly predictable often defined by the number of cells (2,4,8,16, ect) but once you reach blastula there just is not much incentive to try and count nor is it terribly consistent. this may help researchgate.net/figure/… – John 2 days ago
  • It also varies quite a lot by animal. nematodes for instance are famous for having exact cell counts (it can even be used to identify a species) which just does not occur in organisms with hox genes. – John 2 days ago

A starting point could be this very recent amazing movies and the corresponding research article published yesterday.

This is not my field of expertise, but I think you will find relevant information in the references cited by this article.

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