3
$\begingroup$

How does Pox virus duplicate it's genome? Does it bring DNA polymerase or RNA polymerase into the host cell?

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

Poxviruses, such as variola (the causative agent of smallpox) and vaccinia (the active constituent of the vaccine that eradicated smallpox), are very large, complex DNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm, rather than the nucleus. Because of this, they must carry enzymes with them to accomplish tasks that occur in the nucleus of the eukaryotic cells they infect. This includes all the proteins necessary for mRNA synthesis (e.g., a DNA dependent RNA polymerase). The enzymes for DNA replication are encoded in the poxvirus genome and are transcribed and translated as part of the "early" stage, directly after adsorption and penetration.

So, yes, poxviruses bring their own preformed RNA polymerase with them. They don't bring their own DNA polymerase with them, but they do produce it shortly after infecting a cell.

You can read more about this in Murray Medical Microbiology Chapter 54.

$\endgroup$
-3
$\begingroup$

Viruses are fascinating because instead of producing any proteins themselves, they hijack the host cell's cellular machinery to build the proteins instead. They don't bring any proteins with them aside form the structural components of the capsid and tail and the functional proteins which attach to target cells and inject the genetic material into the cytoplasm. Check out the wikepedia page on viral replication, and the British society of immunology

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Many viruses bring enzymes along with them that aren't involved in adsorption or penetration. Poxviruses are the prototypic example. $\endgroup$ – De Novo supports GoFundMonica Oct 16 '18 at 22:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.