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I just have a quick question. If there was an infection of a tissue within the body, white blood cells would leave the capillaries around the tissue and enter the tissues to help cure the infection. How would these cells leave the tissue after that? Would the white blood cells be broken down or would they manage to find their way back into the capillary that they came from?

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White blood cells, especially neutrophils, rapidly leave the blood and migrate in tissues toward infections (or other forms of stimulations). Many of them do die at the location of an infection, but they can also migrate back. The simplest route for this is to follow lymph flow. Lymphatic fluid is picked up by lymphatic vessels, which work in parallel to blood vessels, and from there can move back into blood. Just as an example of migration through lymphatics

Thus, we provide in vivo evidence that neutrophils, like DCs or inflammatory monocytes, migrate via afferent lymphatics to lymphoid tissue and can shuttle live microorganisms.

--Neutrophils rapidly migrate via lymphatics after Mycobacterium bovis BCG intradermal vaccination and shuttle live bacilli to the draining lymph nodes

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