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What do phagocytes release after interacting with a pathogen? I know that this is a broad topic but I only need a general and concise answer.😊

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closed as too broad by James, David, AliceD Nov 5 '18 at 9:52

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Hi and welcome to Bio.SE! What type of phagocytes? I'm not an expert, but immunology responses like these are incredibly complex. What would also be helpful to a potential answerer would be your own attempts at an finding answer, and why those attempts didn't answer your question. $\endgroup$ – James Oct 26 '18 at 11:58
  • $\begingroup$ Wiki has lots of information about the interaction. They are secreted as purrulent flow. it sounds like a homework question which has been mixed up? 😊 $\endgroup$ – com.prehensible Oct 26 '18 at 17:34
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I think it would be hard to delineate what secretions are specifically because of phagocytosis, because in that sort of environment you have multiple types of cells secreting things, and multiple signals through such pathways as toll-like receptors (TLRs). So, I looked at papers involving activated professional phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils. The secretome of the activated cells follows a somewhat typical pattern for innate immune cells: IL-1ß, TNF family, interferons, IL-6, IL-8, and a host of other chemokines and cytokines (1, 2, 3). Mast cells of course secrete things such as histamine in response to Fc-receptor stimulation and TLR signaling.

Non-professional phagocytes like epithelial cells lack receptors to make phagocytosis efficient, but I'm far less certain about the body of data on non-professional phagocytosis. We know that activated epithelium and endothelium secrete inflammatory signals to attract immune cells, for example, like IP-10 which attracts CXCR3-expressing cells.

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Phagocytes eat the pathogen cells by process of phagocytosis. They engulf the cell debris and pathogens by forming pseudopodia around them. However there are other cells which perform secretion. For example mast cells secrets histamine, serotonin etc. and fibroblasts secrets the blood matrix

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