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When considering pathogenic gram-negative bacteria, is there any difference between the function of transport proteins and effector proteins? Or are they of the same functionality? Any reference would be very helpful.

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  • $\begingroup$ Any difference with what? Gram positive, non-pathogenic strains? Please expand your question to make it more clear. $\endgroup$ – BPinto Oct 22 '18 at 13:01
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    $\begingroup$ This is a pretty clear question. It's asking for the difference between two types of proteins involved in bacterial pathogenesis. They are often not well described in microbiology classes. $\endgroup$ – De Novo Oct 22 '18 at 16:39
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Is there any difference between the function of transport proteins and effector proteins?

Yes. In this context, the term "effector proteins" refers to proteins that are inserted into a host cell on infection to modulate host cell processes. Effector proteins are inserted into a host cell using a secretion system. The proteins involved in the secretion system are transport proteins, but the effector proteins themselves have a wide variety of functions. They include enzymes, transcription factors, and protein-protein interaction partners, and they have been shown to regulate many host cellular processes, from metabolism, to vesicular trafficking, cell adhesion, and apoptosis.

You can read more about this here. This review has an interesting perspective, and the Wikipedia page on Bacterial effector proteins isn't bad either.

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