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My textbook (which is Biotechnology by David P. Clark) states, when talking about fate-mapping potential stem-cells:

"If the marked cell is not a stem cell, the marker will not be passed onto descendants since normal differentiated somatic cells do not divide by mitosis."

He then goes on to say:

"Most adult differentiated cells do not divide at all and are considered postmitotic."

So there are some differentiated somatic cells which divide, but apparently not by mitosis? So what is the technical term for their division?

Here is a screenshot of the passage: enter image description here

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There is no known alternative mechanism of proper cell division apart from mitosis and meiosis in animals. I think this is an unfortunate phrasing where the author is trying to introduce the term "postmitotic". The reason for saying "most adult differentiated cells" is because some cells in adults are considered differentiated but they still proliferate under certain conditions, like for example the cells of the adaptive immune system.

It could also be that the author is trying to be overly cautious because there are cells that split parts of themselves off and release them. These mechanisms could be considered cell division in some sense but are neither mitosis nor meiosis. Examples of this are the release of platelets by megakaryocytes and the release of extracellular vesicles by cells undergoing apoptosis.

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Mammalian cells can do either mitosis or meiosis. Depending on the context, meiosis might be an option but usually this is not the case, and many articles don't explicitly state it when they refer to mitosis.

I do understand your confusion. All I can think of is that perhaps the passage was referring to the fact meiotic cells are not as pluripotent as some other stem cells.

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