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I have googled it and I found that it is, because of good memory, but how it can be due to good memory as it didn't happen before. It happened to me many times, that I feel that the scene which is happening now, has already happened to me in my past. But it was a new scene in my life, so why does I feel like this? How is it possible that a same scene happens twice?. What is the reason behind it, that we feel something twice in our lives.

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What you are talking about is a déjà vu, the feeling of familiarity even though the situation is not familiar at all. It is, in fact, a very common phenomenon. A high percentage of people report having had déjà vus. It is nevertheless hard to put a number to it, because the experiences and déjà vu definitions might be different. I have found numbers between 60 and 90% of the population.

The claim that this is a sign of a good memory is related to the view, that a déjà vu is not a false memory, because you actually realize that the situation should be unfamiliar to you (also mentioned here).

But how do déjà vus happen? There are several theories...

It seems clear that déjà vus are associated with activity in the temporal lobe (on the side of the brain). That's where memory is processed, especially episodic memory (things that happen - in contrast to learning a skill). People with epilepsy often report déjà vus right before a seizure that starts in the temporal lobe.

One theory, put forward in this paper, says that the memory and feeling of familiarity are processed in different areas and there is a false activation of the familiarity area during a déjà vu. The brain is not always working proberly, e.g. false sensations can happen, like hallucinations. So, the false activation of that familiarity center could give us the sense of familiarity in an unfamiliar situation.

Similar to this is the idea, that there might be a mismatch between perception and memory formation. When something we are experiencing right now is "leaking" into our memory due to false activation, we think that this has happened in the past. There is a problem with this explanation: despite having a strong feeling of familiarity during a déjà vu, people fail to give any context to when this previous event happened or which other events have preceded it. So, it doesn't seem to be perceived as a memory.

Another explanation could be a false combination of the experience with something that is loosely connected to it (like planning the trip, watching a movie with a similar scene, etc.). Our brain always tries to connect experiences. It might falsely identify something you've seen in pictures or read in a book as a real experience.

As you see, we still struggle to explain the phenomenon. It is caused by some error in the way our brain perceives a situation, writes or retrieves memory or processes familiarity. This error might be a wrong activation or wrong timing or the like.

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