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I like to know what percentage of genetic disease are preventable before birth?

Also, when we can detect all of them? I heard in a TV show a doctor said about 5 years later we can prevent all genetic disease! Is this estimation true?

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closed as too broad by Remi.b, David, theforestecologist, kmm, Bryan Krause Dec 19 '18 at 21:36

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Five years to prevent all genetic disease is ridiculously, insanely wrong. $\endgroup$ – iayork Dec 12 '18 at 15:41
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There is no simple answer to either of your questions.

There are many monogenic diseases where mutations in single genes result in disease phenotype.

There are far more diseases that have a genetic component where mutations in one or more gene increase the baseline risk of disease and this risk is then modified by the environment the individual encounters throughout their life-time (see Multiple Genes).

To get an overview of the functions of genes that have been so far identified, mutations within them and the diseases they have been linked to see Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM).

If you want to get a feel for just how complex genetics is then a recently published paper on the genetics of hair colour would be worth reading...

Genome-wide study of hair colour in UK Biobank explains most of the SNP heritability

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I like to know what percentage of genetic disease are preventable before birth?

Essentially 0%. There have been a few experimental applications of gene thereapy, but we're talking about a few thousand of people in the entire world. None are available in the context of ordinary medical care. Some genetic diseases can treated after birth with drugs that moderate the worst effects: haemophilia, PKU, and cystic fibrosis for example, but the underlying genetic problem remains.

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  • $\begingroup$ I think this answer should clarify that it's talking about what's currently preventable, not what's theoretically preventable. $\endgroup$ – Jam Dec 17 '18 at 15:42

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