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I am wondering for prokaryotes if Deutrium Oxide could be made into Deutrium Glucose or other biological compounds with Deutrium.

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closed as off-topic by David, WYSIWYG Jan 10 at 11:00

  • This question does not appear to be about biology within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Homework questions are off-topic on Biology unless you have shown your attempt at an answer. For more information see our homework policy. Moreover, this question is not really about biology. $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Jan 10 at 11:00
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    $\begingroup$ I am sorry that this is not for biology but this is not homework. I am a Freshman in High School. I am currently learning about Meiosis and Genetics. If this is not biology then what would it be? It relates to living organisms, and it ain't physics. $\endgroup$ – Aravind Karthigeyan Jan 10 at 14:57
  • $\begingroup$ We don't mean homework just in the literal sense. For any query that you have out of interest or as a result of your academic courses, you should make an attempt at finding out the answer yourself with whatever resources that you have and can understand. Did you try simply googling this query? Your query relates to isotope exchange which I would consider a chemistry question. If your query was more about whether organisms can survive and function properly with deuteriated biomolecules, then it may be considered a biological question. $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Jan 11 at 9:41
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Yes, this is possible and inter alia used to clarify biosynthetic pathways.

For example in this study. Rats were given deuterated water and the average number of D atoms incorporated in cholesterol and fatty acids was determined. Also deuterium was found in plasma glucose and liver lactate and pyruvate.

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