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In Sanger sequencing, how can we read the sequence if we have 2 bands with the same size?

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closed as off-topic by David, James, kmm, theforestecologist, De Novo Feb 22 at 3:16

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Homework questions are off-topic on Biology unless you have shown your attempt at an answer. For more information see our homework policy." – David, James, theforestecologist, De Novo
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ I can see now how this would be a homework question, although the answer is dependent on the full context which you haven't given us. Please read the site's policy on homework questions, which requires you to demonstrate having tried to find an answer. Also please note that Sanger was a (very famous) person and his name is spelled with a capital S (which is also used at the begining of sentences in English). $\endgroup$ – David Feb 4 at 14:23
  • $\begingroup$ The band size by itself isn't relevant, unless you are using the same primers for PCR as sequencing. $\endgroup$ – swbarnes2 Feb 4 at 17:04
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It happens if your sample contains a mix of two DNA molecules, with different bases at a certain position.

In your case, you would have a mixture of ACTGGCTA and ACTGTCTA.

In real life, the "double band" would be half as intense as the other single bands, as the signal is "divided by two".

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