1
$\begingroup$

I have searched every nook of the internet and I couldn't find a clear and to-the-point answer. Well my story is that I am a young BSc student who wants to do research on neurological conditions because as far as my knowledge goes neurologists cannot do anything about ANYTHING, things like dementia and brain damage lead the person to become completely destroyed and then eventual death is what every doctor has to see. As of current.

So I am asking if we can develop eventually effective treatments for let's say OCD or Alzheimer's? Or that will never happen because of other factors in the ecosystem and it's the rule of the nature that some people are just unfit to survive? If that's possible, and about to happen in my life time -- i.e., I can contribute -- I am in. I am gonna get a doctorate in one of the life sciences and start doing something. Like discovering genes, or understanding the pathophysiology, or discovering drugs, whatever I am competent in and able to. I just cannot see people suffer like that.

$\endgroup$

closed as primarily opinion-based by David, kmm, WYSIWYG Feb 21 at 16:31

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1
$\begingroup$

Yes, levodopa type treatments for parkinsons.

epilepsy: In 2017, 116 children were randomly assigned to undergo epilepsy surgery or receive medical treatment. After 12 months, 77% of the children who had undergone surgery were seizure free compared with 7% who received medical treatment.

Check news and histories of advances in neuroscience and neurology.

Every year drugs improve, it's best to stay objective in the face of mind dysfunction, meditate.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ But will enough research lead to such advances that neurological conditions will be cured? If not, can the patients be significantly benefited in the near future? Thanks in advance. Edit : I'll try to stay objective my best. $\endgroup$ – positive_integer Feb 17 at 11:38

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.