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I am just wondering If there any adapted way of Identifying significant gene rich and gene poor regions in each chromosome for a given genome say mm10?

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    $\begingroup$ What research effort of your own have you put into answering this question? We ask that all posters here do some of their own research, report what they've performed and what they found out, and then specify a question that focuses on something specific about a topic that they still don't understand. Please update with some of your own research effort findings and sharpen your question some. Thanks! $\endgroup$ – theforestecologist Feb 18 '19 at 20:54
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Interesting question. I don't myself know how to do this but a literature search returns some older papers on how this was achieved for pig and chicken genomes over a decade ago. The best way to do this today is to look through annotated genomes (like the mouse mm10) and use a gene density metric. You can achieve this with R code, writing your own code, trying to use some of the rich features provided in-browser at the UCSC genome browser (for mice, otherwise start here), or perhaps try to search literature for gene density stuff. I defer to others for more specialized answers.

PS. Since you're also interested in determining statistical significance, you probably will need to apply this over a sliding window across chromosome lengths, and this kind of question has been answered often elsewhere on SE (example). Sorry I can't be of more help; good luck!

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    $\begingroup$ Thank you for your comment. I found that coverageBed from bedtools has some useful output for identifying gene densities. $\endgroup$ – Biofreek Feb 20 '19 at 5:41

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