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enter image description hereenter image description hereenter image description here This thing was on me. I thought was a stick until it moved. It had a black worm like thing come out one end and stood up and thats how it moved. It would stick to fabric also. In Louisiana

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    $\begingroup$ Looks like a terrestrial Caddisfly, the order of Trichoptera. Please add the location (country) were you found it, we might be able to answer your question. $\endgroup$ – RHA Feb 28 at 18:44
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It may be a Caddisfly (Trichoptera). Though my guess is a moth (Lepidoptera). Specifically one of the Psychidae family, also known as "bagworm moths." They are common pests in most parts of the world and while they're typically seen fixed in place they spend much of their life mobile. Both of these groups spin a case from silk and attach detritus to the outside so without a better look at the resident insect it is basically impossible to distinguish them from a photograph. However, as a general rule (with some exceptions), Caddisfly larva tend to be aquatic. Here are a couple of links to descriptions of the groups (with pictures!) as they appear on BugGuide:
Psychidae

Trichoptera

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    $\begingroup$ Hi David, and welcome to Biology.SE. Answers in general should include supporting reference(s). Species identification answers in particular are best with a representative picture of the species for comparison as well. For a good example of how to answer a species-identification question, see these answers by @theforestecologist $\endgroup$ – De Novo Feb 28 at 19:54
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    $\begingroup$ Knowing the location, I think you are right this is a bagworm. In North America there is only one terrestrial Trichoptera and that species looks different. $\endgroup$ – RHA Feb 28 at 20:09
  • $\begingroup$ @David. Welcome to Bio.SE! As De Novo mentioned, please add some support (preferably from a reputable source!) to strengthen your answer. I agree that this is likely a bagworm (see previous posts on the subject here and here). It's very unlikely to be a trichopteran larvae outside of an aquatic setting. $\endgroup$ – theforestecologist Feb 28 at 22:03

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