4
$\begingroup$

As springtime is starting earlier this year, I wondered if that would mean deciduous trees had more time to photosynthesise and, therefore, they could absorb more CO2 or have longer periods to grow, etc.

Also, is there any evidence that colder climate deciduous trees would fare better or worse as conditions change for them?

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ yes, you can see from the growth rings that they vary year upon year based on warmth and water. Deciduous trees fair differently to climate change depending on species, the ones on the far ends of their ranges can get outcompeted by other trees. euforgen.org/species check the ranges. don't know what references to add. $\endgroup$ Commented Mar 10, 2019 at 3:37

1 Answer 1

-1
$\begingroup$

A warmer climate in this regard is beneficial to photosynthesis and plant growth. The thickness of the tree rings are constrained by the length of the growing season according to University Corporation for Atmospheric Research:

In some areas the limiting factor for growth is water availability, in other areas (especially at high latitudes) it is the length of the growing season.

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the downvote but I do not understand why. If you want me to react you have to write something. Is the question about if buds burst earlier and leaves fall later? Is the cited source not fitting? $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 16, 2023 at 21:26

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .