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There are numerous articles online which claim that household 3% hydrogen peroxide can kill mold growing on household surfaces, yet I haven't managed to find scientific studies that show that. My question is what concentration of hydrogen peroxide is sufficient for killing household mold (defined usually as a reduction of 99% or some other number)?

I have tried searching online for studies regarding the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide in killing mold, and for the minimum concentration of hydrogen peroxide for killing mold, but I didn't manage to really find information on that, though I am not that skilled in finding such information and also don't have much access to scientific literature.

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it’s not about Biology in terms of SE Biology. $\endgroup$ – David Apr 27 at 17:59
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The CDC Guideline for Disinfection and Sterilization in Healthcare Facilities provides a good overview of various disinfectants and their effectiveness against different kinds of pathogens, along with citations if you're interested in more detail.

This document doesn't evaluate the effectiveness of Hydrogen Peroxide against Stachybotrys (black mold) specifically (the CDC specifically recommends Chlorine Bleach for this purpose), but it does describe it's effectiveness as a fungicide. Note that the level of disinfection needed to control pathogenic fungus in a healthcare setting is likely much higher than needed to control black mold in a house, but it can give you a sense of how effective Hydrogen Peroxide is overall:

A 0.5% accelerated hydrogen peroxide demonstrated bactericidal and virucidal activity in 1 minute and mycobactericidal and fungicidal activity in 5 minutes [656]

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A 7% stabilized hydrogen peroxide proved to be sporicidal (6 hours of exposure), mycobactericidal (20 minutes), fungicidal (5 minutes) at full strength ... [655]

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The 7% solution of hydrogen peroxide, tested after 14 days of stress (in the form of germ-loaded carriers and respiratory therapy equipment), was ... fungicidal (>5 log10 reduction in 20 minutes),[663]

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A new, rapid-acting 13.4% hydrogen peroxide formulation (that is not yet FDA-cleared) has demonstrated sporicidal, mycobactericidal, fungicidal, and virucidal efficacy. Manufacturer data demonstrate that this solution sterilizes in 30 minutes and provides high-level

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Commercially available 3% hydrogen peroxide is a stable and effective disinfectant when used on inanimate surfaces disinfection in 5 minutes [669]

From this, it seems like you'd want to use accelerated Hydrogen Peroxide, or 7% stabilize Hydrogen Peroxide to ensure fungicidal disinfection. 3% Hydrogen Peroxide is effective against bacteria, but the studies cited didn't test it against fungi.

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