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As I know Dopamine is almost exclusively produced via metabotropic receptors, is it possible for a nicotinic ACH receptor to influence a dopamineric neuron? Can a nicotinic ACH receptor cause a dopamineric synapse to create dopamine?

Unfortunately I can't find anything about it.

Edit: rephrasing my question: Do 2-neural systems exist where neuron A has a nACH-R and neuron B has a dopamineric receptor? And do dopamineric nikotinic ACH-R exist (receptors which react to dopamine)?

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  • $\begingroup$ Your question doesn't make much sense because I think you have a variety of misconceptions all mixed together. Dopamine is not produced by metabotropic receptors, that statement is nonsense. The (general) order of things in the nervous system is: Cell A releases neurotransmitter onto Cell B, causing it to be more or less likely to fire for some period afterwards. If Cell A releases dopamine, it will affect Cell B if it has synapses on Cell B and if Cell B has receptors for dopamine. Cell A could possibly have receptors for any other neurotransmitter. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Apr 15 at 19:21
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for your clarifications. Do 2-neural systems exist where neuron A has a nACH-R and neuron B has a dopamineric receptor? And do dopamineric nikotinic ACH-R exist (receptors which react to dopamine)? $\endgroup$ – user51074 Apr 16 at 7:30
  • $\begingroup$ Still doesn't make sense. Are A and B connected? What neurotransmitters do they release? What is a dopaminergic nicotinic ACh receptor to you? Do you know what acetylcholine is? $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Apr 16 at 7:49
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, A and B are connected, A has n-ACHR and B has dopamineric receptors. is this constellation possible or not? Is it possible for a neuron with n-ACH-R to influence a neuron with a dopamineric receptor directly? $\endgroup$ – user51074 Apr 16 at 8:29
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Let's simplify your question with correct terminology: you have a presynaptic neuron and a post-synaptic neuron. The presynaptic neuron can release multiple signals (neurotransmitters) into the synaptic space, or cleft. The postsynaptic neuron can be equipped with multiple sensors (receptors) that are specific to detect certain signals.

The signal and the sensor don't have to match, although this is costly if it's poorly tuned. Most neurons that are entirely unresponsive are pruned. Darwinian selection makes circuits much more efficient than what pure chance alone would produce, but remember that nature can be quite imperfect and stochastic.

However, you can have neurons that have a dopamine sensor (receptor) and provide an acetylcholine signal (neurotransmitter) and vice versa.

Acetylcholonergic and dopaminergic neurons can be connected. Here is an example.

Also, most people forget that neurons not only form chemical synapses but electrical synapses as well. That means the circuitry does not rely on ligands and receptors.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for giving a straight to the point answer. $\endgroup$ – user51074 Apr 16 at 15:34
  • $\begingroup$ "The presynaptic neuron can release multiple signals" - Although technically true, I think this statement is potentially misleading. Almost all neurons release a single principle neurotransmitter. "The signal and the sensor don't have to match, although this is costly if it's poorly tuned." - that's not how synapse development works, synapses are developed in an interplay between pre and post synaptic cells. "Most neurons that are entirely unresponsive are pruned" - did you mean synapses? $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Apr 16 at 16:33
  • $\begingroup$ The answer he gave is fine, you don't need to downvote because the ones you gave are complete trash that didn't help at all. Really pathetic that you are most likely the person downvoting both the question and this answer, which exactly provides the answer that I was looking for. $\endgroup$ – user51074 Apr 16 at 16:36
  • $\begingroup$ @BryanKrause My friend Bryan! I don't know what to tell you. You are woefully wrong on every count. These are neuroscience fundamentals we are talking about! Where to being? This is textbook from at least two decades ago. I'm also sure you must be aware that in development, a huge number of neurons are pruned through apoptosis, to remove most of the superfluous elements in the CNS. Lastly, I too thought you were uncharacteristically aggravating to the questioner; in my opinion it was counter-productive. After all, the question was very simple! $\endgroup$ – S Pr Apr 17 at 10:06
  • $\begingroup$ Yes I am aware that neurons release more than one substance, but they do not typically release more than one of the typical neurotransmitters. That is, neurons do not release both dopamine and acetylcholine, for example. Your source is talking about corelease of peptides which do not mediate the immediate synaptic response but instead influence the synapse itself. I am worried your answer is misleading to a novice. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Apr 17 at 13:31

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