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I want to know what phosphorylates tau protein and its 6 isoforms. I know kinases cause phosphorylation events, and in tau it can be phosphorylated in a healthy neuron in the trans conformation, but when it is hyperphosphorylated it becomes the cis conformation of tau.

Do the same or different kinases cause the normal phosphorylation / abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau? Is it completed by a single kinase or multiple kinases?

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So I've done a lot of reading of many different papers and have uncovered that there two types of broad spectrum kinases classified as: Proline-directed kinases, such as CDK5 and GSK-3beta Non-proline directed kinases

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/journals/omcl/2015/151979/

But I read in this paper: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3601591/

that Cdc2 can also phosphorylate tau

My new question is a follow up to my existing previous question, I guess why is tau phosphorylated at all? What causes tau to be phosphorylated at in the first place? Thanks.

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