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A double strand break in DNA is exactly that: the strands of DNA are severed. A cross-linkage occurs when something forms a covalent bond between two nucleotides in DNA. However, is it possible for something to form both a cross-linkage and a double-strand (or single-strand) break? For instance, could one part of a molecule cause a break while another reacts to form a cross-linkage?

For the purposes of this question, enzymes or proteins which do this (If there are any) also count.

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Cisplatin forms DNA-protein crosslinks (so DNA-protein-DNA by extension) in vitro [1] and a review [2] says that cisplatin leads to DSBs (although I can't access the primary source at the moment). But you know, with the exception of ionizing radiation, mutagens usually don't directly cause DSBs. It's caused by repair processes or things like stalling at replication forks because of the mutagen.

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1874601/

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4047912/#!po=11.9919

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Ultraviolet radiation can induce both DNA crosslinking and double strand breaks. Here is a paper reporting sequnce determinants of UV-induced intra-strand crosslinks:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11342214

Here is a paper where the authors propose that UV-induced double-strand breaks are a consequence of repair of oxidative lesions, rather than a primary result of UV photochemistry.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3488256/

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