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T cells have evolved to be strain specific. For a T cell to respond it has to identify not only the foreign antigen but the antigen must also be attached to a self cell. what is the significance of that? Isn't that the reason behind autoimmunity and hypersensitivity? I understand about foreign antigen, but why self cells? the experiment by Zinkernagel and Dorothy about MHC restriction shows that same antigen presented by a foreign cell will not be killed by sensitized T cells.

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  • $\begingroup$ Your question is unclear. "For a T cell to respond it has to identify not only the foreign antigen but the antigen must also be attached to a self cell", not really. The antigens have to be presented to the T-cell via the MHC. Can you please clarify? $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Jun 14 at 12:21
  • $\begingroup$ yes, the antigen is presented by APCs via MHC, but there's a condition to that, the said APC must be a SELF cell, and T cells have to identify that the antigen is presented via a self cell only, otherwise there will be no reaction or killing or response. i mentioned an experiment in mouse by Zinkernagel and Dorothy. i am confused why cant a T cell simply kill the foreign antigen presented on the TCR via MHC, why must it also be on a self cell. recognition of self cells is one of the causes of autoimmune diseases, so why did T cells evolve to be that way? $\endgroup$ – priyanka Jun 14 at 15:27
  • $\begingroup$ So please edit your question to clarify this. Comments are easy to miss and are not searchable. Also, add a link to the research you mentioned. $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Jun 14 at 15:43

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