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The Phys.org article 'DNA microscopy' offers entirely new way to image cells references the new Open Access paper in Cell DNA Microscopy: Optics-free Spatio-genetic Imaging by a Stand-Alone Chemical Reaction.

My question is not about DNA microscopy, but instead about the second kind of microscopy mentioned in the explanation below quoted from the Phys.org article

Until now, microscopy fit into two main categories. The first is based on optics; light microscopy, for example, dates back to the 1600s and relies on visible light to illuminate samples. Scientists have riffed on this approach, even going beyond the visible spectrum. Electron microscopes, fluorescence microscopes, light-sheet microscopes ¬- they're all based on the principle that samples emit photons or electrons, and the microscope detects the emission.

The second category is based on dissecting samples at locations defined by a microscope. Computer programs then stitch together each dissected piece into a complete picture of the intact sample. Optical imaging can offer intricate portraits of subcellular structure and action. Dissection-based microscopy can give scientists genetic information.

I don't really understand exactly what is being referenced by the 2nd paragraph. What is "Dissection-based microscopy" and how can it give genetic information?

The passage seems to repeat a few sentences in the introduction to the Cell paper:

These approaches closely mirror the two ways in which microscopic images have been acquired to date: either (1) detecting electromagnetic radiation (e.g., photons or electrons) that has interacted with or been emitted by a sample, or (2) interrogating known locations by physical contact or ablation (e.g., dissection).

This may shed some light on the question for those more familliar with the techniques discussed, but I still don't understand what technique this is really referring to.

See also NY Times' DNA Microscope Sees ‘Through the Eyes of the Cell’

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