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Biosafety levels commonly defined on basis of human/animal pathogens, but what would be the biosafety levels for plant pathogens?

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Plant pathogens are not a health hazard to the experimenters. However, they can pose health hazards to plants and cause damage to ecosystem. There are plant biosafety levels: BL1-P up to BL4-P (also sometimes abbreviated as BSL-1P and so on). The four levels have an increasing order of stringency of containment. Containment of plant pathogens (also seeds and pollen) is the primary concern, not exposure to them.

From NIH guidelines:

For research involving plants, four biosafety levels (BL1-P through BL4-P) are described in Appendix L, Physical and Biological Containment for Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecule Research Involving Plants. BL1-P is designed to provide a moderate level of containment for experiments for which there is convincing biological evidence that precludes the possibility of survival, transfer, or dissemination of recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid molecules into the environment, or in which there is no recognizable and predictable risk to the environment in the event of accidental release. BL2-P is designed to provide a greater level of containment for experiments involving plants and certain associated organisms in which there is a recognized possibility of survival, transmission, or dissemination of recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid molecule containing organisms, but the consequence of such an inadvertent release has a predictably minimal biological impact. BL3-P and BL4-P describe additional containment conditions for research with plants and certain pathogens and other organisms that require special containment because of their recognized potential for significant detrimental impact on managed or natural ecosystems. BL1-P relies upon accepted scientific practices for conducting research in most ordinary greenhouse or growth chamber facilities and incorporates accepted procedures for good pest control and cultural practices. BL1-P facilities and procedures provide a modified and protected environment for the propagation of plants and microorganisms associated with the plants and a degree of containment that adequately controls the potential for release of biologically viable plants, plant parts, and microorganisms associated with them. BL2-P and BL3-P rely upon accepted scientific practices for conducting research in greenhouses with organisms infecting or infesting plants in a manner that minimizes or prevents inadvertent contamination of plants within or surrounding the greenhouse. BL4-P describes facilities and practices known to provide containment of certain exotic plant pathogens


Section III-D-5-a. BL3-P (Plants) or BL2-P + biological containment is recommended for experiments involving most exotic (see Section V-M, Footnotes and References of Sections I-IV) infectious agents with recognized potential for serious detrimental impact on managed or natural ecosystems when recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid molecule techniques are associated with whole plants.


Section V-M. In accordance with accepted scientific and regulatory practices of the discipline of plant pathology, an exotic plant pathogen (e.g., virus, bacteria, or fungus) is one that is unknown to occur within the U.S. (see Section V-G, Footnotes and References of Sections I-IV). Determination of whether a pathogen has a potential for serious detrimental impact on managed (agricultural, forest, grassland) or natural ecosystems should be made by the Principal Investigator and the Institutional Biosafety Committee, in consultation with scientists knowledgeable of plant diseases, crops, and ecosystems in the geographic area of the research.

These descriptions refer to plant experiments in greenhouses. When working with plant pathogens in a lab (in vitro culture or on whole plants in incubators), similar guidelines should be followed.

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