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If we have a haploid organism, and it undergoes karyokinesis without cytokinesis, would the organism be considered haploid or diploid?

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Ploidy is generally defined in terms of the number of chromosomes in the nucleus, rather than the number of chromosomes in the cell.

Some examples in support of this: - A paramecium has a diploid micronucleus and polyploid macronucleus - Muscle cells are generally considered diploid even though they have multiple nuclei - The additional chromosomes in mitochondria and chloroplasts are not considered to make cells polyploid, even if the organelle itself may be polyploid.

Thus, I would assess a cell such as you describe to be haploid, albeit with two nuclei.

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  • $\begingroup$ This was very helpful, thank you so much! $\endgroup$
    – laksheya
    Jul 17, 2019 at 4:06

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