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I can't seem to find any etymological root for the hyda- in hydathode. I expected the water-relater structure to be called a hydrothode, but it just isn't!

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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about etymology and Greek language. $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Jul 19 '19 at 8:22
  • $\begingroup$ This may possibly be okay for History of Science and Mathematics or Latin Language but please verify in their meta/chat first. You may be asked to provide more background. $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Jul 19 '19 at 8:25
  • $\begingroup$ @WYSIWYG You are correct. However, those studying biology (with a similarly limited knowledge of Greek and Latin) might have a similar question when first learning about hydathodes. Additionally, the answer given by LinuxBlanket describes the hydathode etymology as being directly related to hydathode physiology, which I think justifies its place in Biology. $\endgroup$ – Don Jul 21 '19 at 7:11
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The etymology of hydathode, according to the Collins dictionary, is "way (hodos) of water (hydat-)". So the correct way of dividing the word is not hyda-thode, but hydat-hode.

Also, "hydat-" is the genitive of the Greek word for water, "hydor" (literally "of water"), whereas "hodos" is in its nominative form ("the way"). If you want to say "water way" in ancient Greek, you have to use nominative+genitive, not nominative+nominative, but there might be also euphonic reasons to why is not *hydrohode.

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Dictionaries are your friend. American heritage says "Greek hudōr, hudat-, water; see wed-1 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots + hodos, way, road." Merriam-Webster says "International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek hydat-, hydōr water + hodos road"

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