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Are there bacteria which consume exclusively non-organic matter? Meaning that they do not require organic matter from other organisms to stay alive and reproduce? A completely pacifistic bacterium.

Or phrased differently, are there bacteria which can stay alive and reproduce indefinitely with only non-organic matter present (plus sunlight or thermal vents etc.)?

I'm asking specifically, to name one or more bacteria species which can do this.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE! It is expected that you will do research on your own before asking questions here — in particular you would benefit from reading up on bacterial ecology — there are hundreds if not thousands of examples of such organisms easily found. For example you could start with the wikipedia article on autotrophs: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autotroph. –––––––– For details on how to use this site, please check out the tour: biology.stackexchange.com/tour and then the help pages on how to ask questions on this site: biology.stackexchange.com/help/how-to-ask. Thanks! 😊 $\endgroup$ – tyersome Jul 21 at 4:15
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    $\begingroup$ Could you clarify your question. What do you mean by non-organic? A chemical definition would be compounds that contain carbon. However, all organisms contain carbon which ultimately comes from carbon dioxide. Do you include photosynthetic bacteria? If so, just look them up on Wikipedia etc. And what on earth do you mean by pacifistic? Are you under the impression that most bacteria survive by killing and eating other bacteria? This is a science site — you need to choose your words carefully so they convey precisely what you mean. $\endgroup$ – David Jul 22 at 12:10
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Sulfate reducing bacteria get their energy converting sulfate to hydrogen sulfide. They are relatively common and may have been the source to turn some oil/gas deposits "sour". Specifics in Wikipedia.

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  • $\begingroup$ But that’s answering only half the question. How do they get the C to use the energy to build their myriad C-containing structural components? $\endgroup$ – David Jul 22 at 18:46

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