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The berries of the fruit are sweet. The tree is growing in Israel.

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  • $\begingroup$ Please edit your post to include where this tree was growing — for identification questions it is important (and often essential) that you include location information. Pictures of the bark could also be helpful. $\endgroup$ – tyersome Aug 21 at 17:54
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    $\begingroup$ This does look somewhat similar to a mulberry though I agree it doesn't look right for a white mulberry. I would, however, guess that it is something in the Moraceae (Mulberry family). —— To test this you could break a small branch or tear a leaf — plants in this family produce latex (a milky looking sap) when damaged. $\endgroup$ – tyersome Aug 22 at 19:38
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    $\begingroup$ Is this a street/landscape tree? What town? Jerusalem has a detailed tree inventory if you read Hebrew. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Hanson Aug 24 at 23:19
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    $\begingroup$ Unfortunately I can't locate a street tree inventory for Haifa. And street trees are frequently not native, which expands the range of possibilities. Your pictures are great, someone will surely know this tree but I cannot figure it out. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Hanson Aug 25 at 13:22
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    $\begingroup$ @tyersome I tested for white sap and there was none. $\endgroup$ – Anixx Aug 27 at 5:52
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Looks like it is Phytolacca dioica. I found this by searching your first image in a phone app called Pl@ntNet (PlantNet). Looking at Wikipedia confirms the ID.

Interestingly, you said the fruit was sweet. The North American relative Phytolacca americana is extremely poisonous. A brief search suggests your species is possibly poisonous, with reports about the leaves more common than the fruit.

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  • $\begingroup$ This site says the berries are juicy so can reduce thristyness: travelermap.ru/chudesa-prirody-13 $\endgroup$ – Anixx Aug 30 at 0:19
  • $\begingroup$ Good to know! Another interesting difference is that your specimen's berries are yellow-green, while P. americana has intensely red-purple berries, due to betalain pigments. Glad we figured this one out! $\endgroup$ – Bryan Hanson Aug 30 at 0:42
  • $\begingroup$ Phytolacca esculenta also has black berries but it is edible and cultivated. The difference between this and american variety is the form of the berries. Also, dioica is a tree while the other two are not. $\endgroup$ – Anixx Aug 30 at 0:52
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Perhaps a white mulberry? See the Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morus_alba

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  • $\begingroup$ Of course, not. The berries are of totally different size and the leaves are totally different. $\endgroup$ – Anixx Aug 22 at 18:32

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