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If you are to increase the intensity of light indefinitely, would you expect the production of oxygen to continue to increase?

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE! We encourage you to do some research on your own and then ask questions informed by what you have learned (ideally with references to reliable sources). Your question as currently written is easily answered by thinking about a moderately extreme case — what would happen to leaf if you directed an industrial laser at it? ——— Please also take the time to go through the tour and the help pages starting with How to Ask questions effectively on this site. Thanks! 😊 $\endgroup$ – tyersome Sep 2 at 18:12
  • $\begingroup$ No. But a simple google search for a graph that shows the relationship between photosynthesis and sunlight (or temperature) would demonstrate this quickly. $\endgroup$ – theforestecologist Sep 15 at 16:10
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No — there are both theoretical limitations and experimentally proven ones.

Chemistry in cells is subject to the same laws as chemistry in general. For photosynthesis to take place, certain molecules (e.g. ADP and NADP+) have to be present to transport the energy harvested to the place where carbohydrates are synthesized from this energy. The transport rate of molecules is limited by the rate of diffusion (see Brownian motion) within a fluid at roughly room temperature (where photosynthesis takes place). This limits the amount of energy that can be processed within a defined volume of plant tissue.

There are further limiting issues. Above certain light intensities, some parts of the plant cell suffer heating and destructive effects, which also limit photosynthesis.

See an abstract on this topic

There are also measured limits. Most plants with leaves exhibit stagnant photosynthesis rates at light with $$600 \frac{μmol}{m^2 \cdot s} $$ or higher.

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  • $\begingroup$ I made some suggestions that I think improve the wording, but overall a nice answer. However, I think it would also be good to add references for: 1) the limiting light intensity, and 2) that photosynthesis is limited by the diffusion rate of molecules like ADP/ATP and NADP⁺/NADPH. $\endgroup$ – tyersome Sep 2 at 18:05
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    $\begingroup$ I'm going to update that, I'm currently dissatisfied with my answer because it leaves too much unclear about my reasoning and its sources. $\endgroup$ – Ariser Sep 4 at 7:08
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Light is one of the factors affecting the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. The very low intensity of light will not let the Photosynthesis reaction to occur at its maximum rate and also too much intensity of the light will lead to the bleaching of the chlorophyll. S0, neither very low nor very high intensity is needed for the photosynthesis to occur at its maximum rate. You can read about this in the article given in the link below:- http://www.rsc.org/learn-chemistry/content/filerepository/CMP/00/001/068/Rate%20of%20photosynthesis%20limiting%20factors.pdf

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