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I've been trying to figure out this for the best portion of this morning, but what structures are responsible for the pad highlighted in red? (sorry for low quality of picture, was just watching the show at the time)

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It's from my understanding that the zygomatic (in green) runs to the edge of the ear in a relative straight line and most muscles have their origins or insertions bellow it. I know there are some fat pads (such as the nasolabial fold in purple) on top of everything on the face, but are these all fat pads that just allign? I've seen this pad on both man and women often, although it seems more proeminent in women.

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That padding is apparently from a prominent zygomatic arch also known as high chickbones (pictures).

The bones between the eye, nose and ear are: the zygomatic bone below and behind the eye, the zygomatic process of the frontal bone above/behind the eye and the zygomatic process of the temporal bone, which extends toward the ear canal. It makes sense that when the zygomatic bone is more prominent, the zygomatic processes of the connecting bones will be also more prominent and appear as high cheeks.

enter image description here

Image source: Wikimedia, CC license

Here's the photo of Abraham Lincoln from the Wikipedia's article about zygomatic bones:

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A Youtube video The Zygomatic Bones and Ogee Curve

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  • $\begingroup$ I can see the presence of the zygomatic bone on the front of the face, and consequentially on its profile and shape under the eyes. What I am refering to is the continuation of the form on the side of the face, behind and above the lateral eye line and where the zygomatic and zygomatic process end, all the way to above the ear. $\endgroup$ – omiyage Sep 5 at 11:58
  • $\begingroup$ @omiyage, I changed the answer and the pictures. I believe, the padding is due to prominent zygomatic arch, so due to the bones. $\endgroup$ – Jan Sep 5 at 16:14

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