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There are of course many species which lay eggs in the bodies of another species and also many species where either the male is eaten after mating or the male dies soon thereafter. So it seems possible that a species might exist where the female lays fertilized eggs in the body of the male with whom she mated or even a different male. I could see however the problem being that there is a significant time gap between mating and the eggs being ready to be laid, so perhaps there are no cases of the former but perhaps there are cases of the latter?

Note: Looking for a form of egg-laying that is destructive to the "host" -- where the developing larvae eat the host, like in the cross-species case.

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Is there an example of a species wherein the female lays eggs in the male?

Yes.

Pipefish & Seahorses to name two.

Both widely mentioned in many wildlife programs as being an example of what you've asked.

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Watch a video of flatworms penis fencing.

Nature never disappoints, it created a real kicker. Some species of flat worms are hermaphrodites, they have penises but also produce and carry eggs. No flatworm wants to be the mom as it uses a lot of energy and food, so the flat worms fight to inseminate each other.

They fight with their penises. the loser gets their eggs fertilized and is the designated mother of the relationship.

all information I used was drawn from Matt Simon's "the wasp that brain washed the caterpillar". If you are interested in weird abilities of strange creatures, I would really recommend checking it out.

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    $\begingroup$ They're hermaphrodites, so both, not really what the question was asking for then. $\endgroup$ – Pelinore Sep 9 at 20:35
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    $\begingroup$ I did see that, my answer was more of a comment to share this cool flat worm story. they clearly have an interest in freaky animals. But I was unsure if it would fit. Hope this helps either way $\endgroup$ – Burtyboy80 Sep 9 at 20:42

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