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Found a large number of these trapped between my window and the window frame. Are they termites?

Location: Eastern Massachusetts, USAenter image description here

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This is an ant in the genus Camponotus. It can only be identified from the habitus on your picture, but clues are that there is only one element between the thorax and the gaster (Formicinae) and the head is large, this with the color and texture pattern leads to Camponotus sp.

Refer to

Bolton, B., Alpert, G., Ward, P. S., & Naskrecki, P. (2006). Bolton’s Catalogue of Ants of the World. Cambridge: Harvard.

for more detail on the identification.

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enter image description here

Based on the morphology of the abdomen and antennae as well as the darker coloration, I'm going to say they are not. Looks a bit more ant-like (see picture).

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, jmc1094. Mine do not have wings. Is it a seasonal thing? $\endgroup$ – George Sep 13 at 20:31
  • $\begingroup$ Not necessarily, I just chose that figure as it illustrates differences in the body types pretty clearly. $\endgroup$ – jmc1094 Sep 13 at 20:37
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, jmc1094. $\endgroup$ – George Sep 13 at 20:48
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    $\begingroup$ Definitely an ant. Ants have elbowed antennae. $\endgroup$ – Karl Kjer Sep 13 at 21:37
  • $\begingroup$ Termites are often nearly white and look as if the have 2 body sections instead of 3 as a typical insect. $\endgroup$ – blacksmith37 Sep 14 at 1:36

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